Cyber Security

Using terms like “highly sophisticated” without providing any actual details of the cyberattack makes one think back to when TalkTalk CEO Dido Harding described a cyber-attack as “significant and sustained cyber-attack” in 2015. In TalkTalk’s case, that cyber attack turned out to be a bunch of teenage kids taking advantage of a then 10-year-old SQL injection vulnerability.  City A.M. described Dido’s responses as “naive”, noting when asked if the affected customer data was encrypted or not, she replied: “The awful truth is that I don’t know“. Today Dido is responsible for the UK governments Track, Test and Trace application, which no doubt will ring privacy alarms bells with some. 

Back to the EasyJet breach, all we know is the ICO and the NCSC are supporting UK budget airline, EasyJet said “We take issues of security extremely seriously and continue to invest to further enhance our security environment. There is no evidence that any personal information of any nature has been misused, however, on the recommendation of the ICO, we are communicating with the approximately nine million customers whose travel details were accessed to advise them of protective steps to minimise any risk of potential phishing. We are advising customers to be cautious of any communications purporting to come from EasyJet or EasyJet Holidays.” 

Know more @ cyber security consultants

It will be interesting to see the DPA enforcement line Information Commission’s Office (ICO) adopts with EasyJet, especially considering the current COVID-19 impact on the UK aviation industry.  Some security commentators have called ICO a “Toothless Tiger” in regards to their supportive response, an ICO label I’ve not heard since long before the GDPR came into force. But the GDPR still has a sting its tail beyond ICO enforcement action in the UK, in that individuals impacted by personal data breaches can undertake a class-action lawsuit. So then, it can be no real surprise to law firm PGMBM announce it has issued a class-action claim in the High Court of London, with a potential liability of an eye-watering £18 billion!. If successful, each customer impacted by the breach could receive a payout of £2,000.

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